Content

“Adversity is your greatest asset.”

John Wooden


Exposed vs Unexposed Content

On big sites, when it comes to making scalable improvements to SEO, content is your greatest asset. And, yes, exposing this content properly to customers and search engines is adversity that every enterprise website is challenged with. This means that if you’re able to create, and expose content, that your competitors are unable to, you can win big even against sites with stronger brand recognition, domain authority.

In Enterprise SEO, there are two types of content: static content and dynamic content. Static is everything that’s created or designed by humans – your promotion offers, your category page descriptions, your product descriptions, your marketing videos, your static links, your content marketing content, your blog posts, your customer service information, your meta data…

Dynamic content is content that’s created by the combination of software functionality, algorithms and databases. Your user-generated content, your product cross-sell / up-sell widgets, your featured images and thumbnails, your navigation links powered by your on-site search engines, your meta data…

Content can be published on the web through HTML, CSS, JavaScript, AJAX, Flash, and other languages. Content can live on your internal servers, your vendors’ external servers, or in the clouds. It may appear in View-Source, Inspect Element, or may not appear at all in your browser’s developer tools. All of these factors directly influence Googlebot and other crawlers’ ability to properly crawl, index, cache, and rank the hundreds of thousands (or more) on your site with all of the content on each page.

This could lead to duplicate / thin content issues, spider traps, link dilution, index bloat, accurate page speed calculations, etc. A good enterprise SEO should be able to test these assumptions, answer questions about bot vs user content discrepancies, and work to leverage content as an asset, and not a liability.


Dynamic (Scalable) Content

How will you optimize for scalable content on category and product page templates? Examples: user-generated content, product images, videos, up-sell/cross-sell widgets, etc.

How should you improve cross-linking and internal linking through content silos, faceted navigation, mega menus, contextual links so that you optimize for keywords, and also themes?

How should you target keyword groups on single pages, instead of individual keywords, so that your copywriters produce clean, useful, and readable information?

How should you use the HTML to format copy, bullet points, and other text elements to rank in Position Zero, aka Featured Snippets?

How should you inter-link upper funnel (informational) and lower-funnel (transactional) content pages to create more thematic and effective customer and search engine journeys?

The more compelling your copy, the more your clicks from any search engine’s result pages. What marketing trigger words can you try using in your content so that your title tags, meta descriptions, internal links, sales copy, and heading tags stand out on a crowded and distracting SERP?

Conversion copywriting is the process of closing a sale. On big retail sites with millions of buyers, even a .5% improvement in completed orders is big money. How can SEO team up with copywriters to increase the number of unique visitors at an even higher conversion rate?

What non-advertising content, pages and files should you optimize to do better SEO? Examples include Schema data, Sitemap data, robots and server files…

Copywriting

Enterprise retail companies often promote via catalogs, and other traditional marketing methods. This limits in-house creative (copywriting, photography, etc.) teams from providing SEO teams optimum support.

If you need to hire freelance copywriters, how should you justify the expense to leadership? What rates should you pay? What pages should you target? What word count range should they hit?

What brand guidelines (voice / style / tone / customer personas) should they write around?

Who edits the written drafts internally? Who optimizes the content for hyperlinks, styling, imagery before posting content on the web?

How should external work be integrated into internal workflows so that when working on large on-page SEO projects (batches of 25+ pages per week), you can create efficient, scalable processes?

Good copywriting can not only influence rankings, but also earn you Featured Snippets in Google. How should you create better requirements for writers so that they’re writing to solve problems, answer questions, and offer helpful information, and not stuffing keywords?

 


Takeaway

On big sites, when it comes to making scalable improvements to SEO, content is your greatest asset. And, yes, exposing this content properly to customers and search engines is adversity that every enterprise website is challenged with. This means that if you’re able to create, and expose content, that your competitors are unable to, you can win big even against sites with stronger brand recognition, domain authority.

Develop a well-rounded content strategy by teaming up with social media teams, IT teams, web content production teams, merchants, and whoever else owns or touches content across the site. Ensure content’s working to your advantage. When ranking pages, Google compares the entire contents from top to bottom: header, sidebar, body, footer.

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